Interracial dating marriage


27-Aug-2016 10:58

These are certainly a lot of numbers to consider and as I mentioned above, each model presents a different proportion.

Over the last several decades, the American public has grown increasingly accepting of interracial dating and marriage.

Among blacks, men are much more likely than women to marry someone of a different race.

Fully a quarter of black men who got married in 2013 married someone who was not black.

(This share does not take into account the “interethnic” marriages between Hispanics and non-Hispanics, which we covered in an earlier report on intermarriage.) Looking beyond newlyweds, 6.3% of all marriages were between spouses of different races in 2013, up from less than 1% in 1970.

Some racial groups are more likely to intermarry than others.

It was not until 1967, during the height of the Civil Rights Movement, that the U. Supreme Court ruled in the case that such laws were unconstitutional. As suc, one could argue that it's only been in recent years that interracial marriages have become common in American society.Compared with older groups, particularly Americans ages 50 or older, Millennials are significantly more likely to be accepting of interracial marriage.While 85% of Millennials say they would be fine with a marriage to someone from any of the groups asked about, that number drops to about three-quarters (73%) among 30-to-49-year-olds, 55% among 50-to-64-year-olds, and just 38% of those ages 65 and older.The Pew Research Center’s recent report on racial attitudes in the U.

S., finds that an overwhelming majority of Millennials, regardless of race, say they would be fine with a family member’s marriage to someone of a different racial or ethnic group.This shift in opinion has been driven both by attitude change among individuals generally and by the fact that over the period, successive generations have reached adulthood with more racially liberal views than earlier generations.